Preserving master pattern
Posted: 25 February 2008 02:38 PM   [ Ignore ]  
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Do y’all have any tips on preserving pattern pieces? I’m about to start work on a pair of shorts and there are a lot more fitting variables than other projects I’ve done. I’d hate to cut up the pattern, not have my test pair fit, and then not have the original pattern available.

—Byron

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Posted: 25 February 2008 02:49 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]  
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There are several good tools to do this.  My favorite is a device that rolls along the pattern contours and perforates the pattern with a spiked wheel.  You then place the perforated pattern over the fabric (or paper to make a copy) and dust with a chalk ball.  It’s about five bucks and widely available. While you’re there, check out the other options like transfer papers (essentially carbon paper).

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Posted: 25 February 2008 03:03 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]  
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make a new one out of paper grocery bags (top half only for shorts), and trim to fit.  2nd year in a row liberty ridge has been part of my costume. My Halloween short shorts were an eyesore to everyone!

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Posted: 29 February 2012 08:24 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]  
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Digging for this topic brought up this old thread…

Ayce, how well does the chalk stay to the fabric?  Working on the Whitney kit, wondering what the best way to transfer the sewing lines to the fabric is.

Was thinking of using a bright light underneath a glass table, then transferring the lines to the fabric with a chalk type pencil.  What is the “normal” way of doing getting the sewing lines onto the fabric?

This will be my first clothing piece.  Done lots of sewing in the past, mostly kites like parafoils, with stiffer fabric.

Also, I’m hoping to not use any pins to hold the fabric together before sewing.  Was planning on using small pieces of double sided tape (that will not be sewn through).  Good/bad idea?

Thanks!
Steve

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Posted: 29 February 2012 08:42 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]  
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It rubs off, but you should be able to dust it and see the trace long enough to cut the pattern.  A longer lasting trace could use tailor’s chalk, or a white prismacolor pencil from the art supply store (hat tip to Quiltbinder for tipping me off about the prismacolor).  With those methods you’d cut the pattern out of it’s page, weight it with a few books, and then trace the edge on the fabric.  The spike wheel perforates but doesn’t separate the pattern from its page.  Sometimes you can use the spike wheel when you want to add details to the interior of the pattern, like pocket placement and the like.

I think the best way though is to have a large cutting mat and rotary cutter.  But that can get spendy for something large enough to be useful.  Maybe go down that road if you like sewing apparel and are going to stick with it.

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Posted: 12 March 2012 07:21 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]  
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I have been using some light grayish red paper that I bought at Home Depot, paint section. I think it is listed as medium rosen paper. The roll is 3’x167’ and costs $12. I have made my own patterns for most projects, but have transferred originals to this paper recently. I simply lay out the roll of paper, lay the pattern on top of it and hold it down with my home made bean bags. I also bought a box of carbon paper, and slip the paper between the two layers overlapping as I go, and draw around the original with the fattest ball point pen I can find. It is easy to check and make sure the transfer is continuous before removing the master pattern.

My cutting board is a sheet of plywood with one good side. Olfa rotary cutters do not work well on the plywood, so I went back to razor blades… they are cheap, and my hand is closer to the work. It is easy to cut out materials. The paper is stiff enough so that throwing a couple of bean bags on the pattern will hold it in place on top of the material. I just use a short steel ruler to press down the pattern where I am cutting so that the material won’t “drag” under the pattern. I used my Weller soldering gun to cut out the silnylon for my last project and was surprised that it did not burn or damage the paper in any way. I have never noticed any of my patterns distorting over time, and the thicker paper is much easier to lay down flat on materials.

OLTS

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Posted: 12 March 2012 07:24 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]  
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I ended up making poster board patterns, and hot cutting out the pieces.  Cutting and sealing in one step.  Very exact and repeatable.

Steve

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