Stuff or Roll - how to pack my new quilt?
Posted: 08 August 2008 04:17 PM   [ Ignore ]  
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Hi all,

I just finished a simple backpacking quilt (my first project, thanks to MarshLaw303 for the advice) and am heading out on a short overnight this weekend to test it out.  The quilt is 5oz Climashield and 1.1oz ripstop with simple yarn loop quilting. 

Although I think I know the answer already, I am curious how others pack their quilts (in the pack, not at home).  My first thought is to simply stuff it into the sack and call it good.  I have always been taught that stuffing is generally better than rolling, as the stuff is random and less likely for the fabric/insulation to “remember”.  Am I correct?

In addition, how much can I compress the insulation without worrying about thermal properties being affected in a major way (assuming, of course, that I have a couple hours to let air out in the tent before bedtime).  Currently, I am stuffing it into an 8” x 18” sack (this is a 56” x 82” quilt).  Can I safely use a compression sack?

thanks!
Brad

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Posted: 08 August 2008 06:22 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]  
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Well, I thought it was not good to stuff, so I roll, but then you have to stuff the rolled form into the bag.  Basically , then its roll and stuff.  Only crank down on the compressions straps just enough to fit the bag into your pack.  ( I get a down quilt into a 10 liter Camp Inn bag)

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Posted: 08 August 2008 08:56 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]  
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OK, one vote for rolling.  Anyone else?

thanks!
B

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Posted: 08 August 2008 10:13 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]  
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One vote for “stay away from compression sacks”.

I pack my bag into the bottom of my pack which is lined with a trash compactor bag liner.  No stuff sack, not rolled.  The less space your food bag takes up, the more space your insulated gear can take up.

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Posted: 19 August 2008 11:32 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]  
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I vote for stuffing. Mostly because it fills out the bag at the bottom and sneaks into all the odd spaces. As Ayce said, when your other stuff decreased in size you can compress the quilt less. In this case, less is more. A no vote on compression sack.

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Posted: 08 September 2008 12:21 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]  
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I roll then stuff my bag or quilt into a waterproof bag, but pack it on the top, not the bottom where heavier gear compacts it even more.  I only use compression sacks in winter tightened just enough to get the bag inside of my pack.  Clothes are on the bottom, food and heaviest gear in the middle, sleeping bag on top. Rain gear and other gear I need quick access to, for example a water filter and headlamp, are stowed in an outside mesh pocket.

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Posted: 18 November 2008 11:27 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]  
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I do the same as AYCE.  Put your quilt into the bottom of the pack in a waterproof bag and then pack all your other gear on top.  It will allow the quilt to take on the shape of the pack and use up all the space in the bottom.  Compress it enough to get the rest of your gear in on top.  That way you aren’t over compressing the insulation.

John

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