Liberty Ridge Pants
Posted: 13 August 2007 02:40 PM   [ Ignore ]  
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I just completed the Liberty Ridge Pants (black ripstop with black thread).  Working with black thread on the black material is somewhat challenging.  The completed pants weigh in at 2.5oz.  (I substituted a soft cord for the supplied cord.)  Sewing the zippers in the legs works well if you really follow AYCE’s instruction on the ‘box.’  Overall, project went smoothly.

There is one possible typo (or maybe I didn’t understand) regarding the material for the waist belt.  On the first page the instructions call for a “long straight strip of fabric 1.25” wide”).  Have to fold this material later on to make the cord tube.  On about page 5, in the discussion on button holes, there is a mention of a 2” strip (presumably referring to the width of the material for the waist belt).  Folding the 1.25” material in half for the tube and completing with a French seam doesn’t leave much room to work with (certainly not 2” wide).  Should the material really be cut to only 1.25” wide?  (I used about 1.5” wide and with a lot of trickery made the tube.)

Also, my machine doesn’t like to sew button holes with the slippery ripstop (even with the Grossgrain behind).  I had to manually work up a button hole.  Any suggestions?

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Posted: 13 August 2007 03:59 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]  
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Nice job with the LR Pants- that’s a good project.

The strip originally was 1.25” wide.  It’s hard to turn the waist draw cord casing inside out with a 1.25” strip, so it was later increased to 2”. I’ll take a look at the instructions and make sure they are consistent RE strip width.
The width of the draw cord is only 1/8” for the supplied griptese cord, or 1/4” if you want that flat cord.  With a 1.25” strip there is still @ .5” of width to feed the cord.  But it is harder to turn that narrow long tube.

Also, my machine doesn’t like to sew button holes with the slippery ripstop (even with the Grossgrain behind).  I had to manually work up a button hole.  Any suggestions?

Keep practicing. 

AYCE

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Posted: 13 August 2007 07:28 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]  
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hodgsonm - 13 August 2007 02:40 PM

Also, my machine doesn’t like to sew button holes with the slippery ripstop (even with the Grossgrain behind).  I had to manually work up a button hole.  Any suggestions?

Are you just placing the Grossgrain behind the fabric? offten I find if your dealing with slippery fabric you need to pin the fabrics to stabilize it. I also don’t find Grossgrain to be a very good stabilizer for something small like a single button hole since it’s somewhat slippery it’s self. 

They sell tear-a-way stabilizers at sewing shops for about 99 cents a yard that work really well and doesn’t add weight since you pull it away afterwards. These fabics have a heavy “tooth” that help prevent it from slipping while sewing. I don’t like to recommend this but scotch tape also works in a pinch as a cheap tear-a-way stabilizer but keep in mind it can gun up your needle.

as AYCE said practice is the key

Joe F

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