Kinsman Draft Tube, Part 2
Posted: 08 June 2013 07:19 PM   [ Ignore ]  
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... Continued form Kinsman Draft Tube, Part 1

Step 10. After adding a zipper top stop if needed, pin and sew the zipper on the draft tube. I put the end of the zipper just above where the fold will be. That way, the top stop won’t be visible but will have some “breathing room” above it. I kept it at about 1/4” below where the collar seam will be, as per AYCE’s instructions.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/97152865@N05/8988796487/in/set-72157634013052796/

http://www.flickr.com/photos/97152865@N05/8988796829/in/set-72157634013052796/

http://www.flickr.com/photos/97152865@N05/8989994156/in/set-72157634013052796/

Step 11. You can trim or serge the long, raw end of the draft tube if desired. Note: this will end up in the jacket seam but I always like to keep my edges clean if possible.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/97152865@N05/8989994592/in/set-72157634013052796/

Step 12. The tricky part, only because what you do here will be very visible… Here, you want to fold over the top and then sew it down. You sew it down just because it makes things much easier when you are installing the zipper/draft tube in the jacket, an already highly stressful time in the project!  ;) 

Fold the top down, being careful to not let the seam show. If it does, just roll it a bit under your fingers to hide it. Then once again, bring out the iron. Iron the corner down carefully, making it the way you want it to look. Be careful not to iron in an unwanted crease in the visible triangle. Then, keeping it pressed down with your fingers, put it under your already-prepped presser foot and bring the presser foot down, which will keep it in place. Run a line of stitching pretty close to the raw edge. Remember, this stitching is only to hold it in place; it will be stitched down permanently as part of the zipper installation step. For some reason, in the picture you can’t see the stitching but it is there.

Step Later: One of the tricky parts it took me awhile to figure out was how to get the top of the draft tube to end exactly at the top of the jacket, which happens when you are installing the zipper in the jacket. Ideally, your draft tube will end exactly where the collar seam will be. If you stitch higher than that, (ie “turn the corner” after you’ve passed the top of the draft tube), you’ll end up with an unsightly gap between the top of the collar and the top of the draft tube, which will be lower. If you turn the corner before arriving at the top of the draft tube, you end up with the more unsightly result of your windflap sewn into the inside of the collar. People WILL laugh.

So, the trick is to sew up the side, and when you start arriving at the top of the draft tube (again, ideally right at the collar seam location), go to a shorter stitch. Turn the wheel by hand and stop within a stitch on either side of the top of the draft tube. Then, with the needle down, raise the pressure foot and rotate the fabric 90 degrees like you would have anyway. Go back to your regular length stitch.

Now, reach in between the fabrics and fold the draft tube AWAY from the upcoming stitch line. Just move it away from where you will be stitching. Get it out of the way and then turn the wheel by a hand a few times and get it away from the draft tube. After a half inch or so, go ahead and start sewing again, making sure it doesn’t get caught in the stitch. After an inch, you’re home free. If you do it this way, you should end up with your draft tube aligned perfectly with the top of the jacket. Try it with some muslin first just to get an idea of what’s happening. I made two jackets with funky draft tubes until I finally figured this out.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/97152865@N05/8988798151/in/set-72157634013052796/

It seems like there are a lot of steps but it really doesn’t take long. It took me 17 hours to figure out how to make one, but this mock-up here took less than 45 minutes including stopping to take pictures. I’m sure I could do one in 15 minutes now. Just go slow and maybe try a practice one or three. They are actually pretty easy!

Nick

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Posted: 24 November 2013 12:50 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]  
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Hey Nick,

It’s been some time since I’ve checked in on the site but you’re take on the directions are great and I’ve never really considered myself much of wordsmith ;-)

cheers

Joe

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Posted: 15 December 2013 07:10 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]  
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Hey Joe!

Good to see you back on the site!

Just wanted to say that your projects and postings were both extremely helpful and inspiring! You had some really creative takes on the Thru-Hiker projects.

You really made some great stuff, and your step-by-step progress reports were super helpful when I started working on projects. I have referred to them many times, and have learned a ton from them.

Just finished a pair of insulated Liberty Ridge pants, and again, found your postings very helpful.

You are pretty productive and efficient compared to me; my “Final” Kinsman took about 75 hours to complete! ;)

Nick

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Posted: 15 December 2013 08:21 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]  
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Hey Nick thanks, for the kind words. I love making stuff and although I haven’t been doing as much sewing lately I still work it into other projects. Making the jackets and all the other gear really feeds off it’s self and I find to this day I check out gear when I’m in REI or a fancy climbing store. I’m always interested in how gear or clothing is made and the solutions that find for colds, zippers and patterns.

I’m sure it’s the same, you have a lot aha moments and that’s fun.

I recently tired a friends neck gator that he loved, After looking it over I used some left over fabric from one of my jackets along with some fleece. Came out great then I made a few more for Christmas. The roll up table is also something I saw when camping with a friend by motorcycle. The legs are held with Elevator washers once removed it rolls up into a bag I made from 1.9 rips stop I had left over from backpack.

cheers

Joe

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Posted: 19 December 2013 01:20 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]  
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I agree - making stuff is really fun and rewarding, though always WAY more time and work than it seems when you first envision it.  ;)

Yup, I’m constantly checking out gear in the stores now, trying to figure out how they did it. You really do get a lot of ideas on techniques, except when you look at Arc’Teryx apparel and then you just feel awe. ;)

It is pretty cool when you can see something like your friend’s neck gaiters and then be able to make it yourself, and even customize it with fit or fabrics the way you want. That’s a good skill to have! That table you made looks really nice - very clever!

My latest project has been a pair of insulated Liberty Ridge pants (harder than I thought) and am now starting on an overquilt, both for winter camping.

Nick

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Posted: 20 December 2013 10:56 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]  
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I remember when I did my insulated pants it was the first time I used a non-insulated pattern and graded it to insulated. I had a hell of a time figuring out how to do it. Ayce gave me some really great advice and help explaining how you use strips of netting to stabilize the seams. I finished my off at the cuff but I think redoing it I’d have done the waist.

Brest of luck and post some pictures where you’re done. Happy Holiday!

Joe

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