quilt pattern
Posted: 11 September 2007 04:16 AM   [ Ignore ]  
Recent Registration
Rank
Total Posts:  5
Joined  2007-09-05

Where are some places that i can go and see patterns of UL quilts.  I have seen pictures of some projects that people have done, and i would like to try to make one myself.  I like the pattern on this site, but i would like to see some other patterns.  Thanks for the help!

Profile
 
 
Posted: 17 September 2007 06:58 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]  
Recent Registration
Rank
Total Posts:  2
Joined  2007-09-17

http://www.backpacking.net/makegear.html

try that link but click on “light quilt” on the left side menu.  It is synthetic, but the design could easily be modified for down.  I like the fact that the design is very simple to make.  I would probably add some kind of drawcord.  One for the opening than would slip under my pad, and another around the shoulder area.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 21 September 2007 05:38 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]  
Member
RankRankRank
Total Posts:  35
Joined  2007-09-12

That’s an interesting link. 
I’m a little confused about this point:

6.  Now you need to stop the insulation from moving around on you. Cut a long strip of cardboard the same thickness as the loft you want your bag to be. Place the cardboard strip edgewise on the top of the quilt in one top corner. Take thicker thread or yarn and with a large needle pass the yarn down through the quilt to the other side. Now pass the yarn back through to the top on the other side of the cardboard. Knot the yarn on top of the cardboard. Remove the cardboard strip. You now have a loop that is the matching height of your loft so it will stop the insulation from bunching up, but will allow it to loft. Repeat this loop making procedure at 8-12 inch intervals on the quilt.

So that means that there are going to be all these yarn loops throughout the quilt?  I don’t think I’ve ever seen a synthetic fill sleeping bag that had yarn loops going through the shell fabric.  Is there another way to secure the insulation from bunching up?

Profile
 
 
Posted: 21 September 2007 12:34 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]  
Administrator
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  432
Joined  2007-05-07

So that means that there are going to be all these yarn loops throughout the quilt?  I don’t think I’ve ever seen a synthetic fill sleeping bag that had yarn loops going through the shell fabric.  Is there another way to secure the insulation from bunching up?

Sure, there are ways to do it other than with yarn loops.  They involve stitching the insulation directly to the shell, liner, or to an intermediary scrim.  This type of construction usually includes other design elements to limit the zero-loft effect from direct insulation stitching, such as shingle construction or offset quilting.

The yarn loops, though, work quite well (except on short-staple insulations) and are very easy to pull off.  They do look frumpy, though, but a lot of frumpy gear works well on the trail.

AYCE

Profile
 
 
Posted: 12 October 2007 06:50 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]  
Member
RankRankRank
Total Posts:  46
Joined  2007-06-21

From Neatoman:

http://home.comcast.net/~neatoman/quilt.htm

Profile
 
 
Posted: 31 October 2007 04:02 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]  
Recent Registration
Rank
Total Posts:  4
Joined  2007-10-31
AYCE - 21 September 2007 12:34 PM

Sure, there are ways to do it other than with yarn loops.  They involve stitching the insulation directly to the shell, liner, or to an intermediary scrim.

Using your prequilted Primaloft One, would it make most sense to a) stitch through the insulation onto the shell b) yarn loop c) just sew a nylon “bag” and drop in the insulation or d) something else entirely?

Basically I’m wondering how the prequilt changes the equation.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 31 October 2007 10:43 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]  
Administrator
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  432
Joined  2007-05-07

If you’re talking about the Momentum PL1 prequilt, it’s already been quilted to the momentum.

The other scrim-1.8 oz PL1-scrim stuff wouldn’t be good for a quilt.  1.8 oz of insulation would be good for apparel, gloves, hat, etc. 
With two layers of scrim, you wouldn’t want to put more than one layer in a project as scrim weighs 3 to 4 tenths of an ounce per square yard.

Profile
 
 
   
 
 
‹‹ breathable bivy      tooth zipper for whitney ››