Any issues using Momentum on both sides of a Quilt?
Posted: 24 September 2007 06:42 PM   [ Ignore ]  
Member
RankRankRank
Total Posts:  16
Joined  2007-07-31

I was just wondering if you can use Momentum 90 on both the inside and outside of a quilt?

Profile
 
 
Posted: 24 September 2007 10:08 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]  
Administrator
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  432
Joined  2007-05-07

Hi Captn-

Yes- Momentum works great for both the shell and the liner.  Typically the taffeta is used for the liner and the MR for the shell, but you can use either one for the shell and liner.

AYCE

Profile
 
 
Posted: 29 September 2007 11:31 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]  
Member
RankRankRank
Total Posts:  16
Joined  2007-07-31

Finished the quilt today.

Sorry I can’t find my camera, but I did something a bit different on my quilt. I made it a bit oversized and purchased 4 yards of XP. I doubled the xp on the bottom portion of the quilt so that I have a 5 oz basis weight layer up to my chest and a single layer over that. I always carry my insulated pullover anyway, so this way I can just wear it to bed and have a 20 degree sleep system for just 16 ounces.

I made it 58 inches wide, much larger than most .... and added length to the quilt so I can tuck the top. I figure that this added 2 oz to the quilt, and that the extra insulation added 4 oz. If I can eliminate the need for the Bivy, which it seems in likely given this design, I can save 7 oz on the bivy, and save 8 oz for insulated pants.  I’m also using this in place of my montbell #3 at 24 oz. In essence I’m losing 15 oz from my kit down to 30 degrees and 23 oz total down to 20 degrees.

I didn’t quilt the quilt with yarn either .... I didn’t want to break the momentum and give moisture a path to migrate into the quilt, so I’ll have to treat it gently.

I hope to be able to use this quilt without a bivy down to the high 20s and in fact am looking to add bug netting and velcro to my gatewood cape for bug protection, at just 4 oz over my Golite poncho tarp weight.


Mark

Profile
 
 
Posted: 30 September 2007 12:01 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]  
Administrator
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  432
Joined  2007-05-07

I did something a bit different on my quilt. I made it a bit oversized and purchased 4 yards of XP. I doubled the xp on the bottom portion of the quilt so that I have a 5 oz basis weight layer up to my chest and a single layer over that. I always carry my insulated pullover anyway, so this way I can just wear it to bed and have a 20 degree sleep system for just 16 ounces.

Clever idea, and something I haven’t seen done before. Definitely let us know how it works in practice. 

Congrats on your quilt, and have a blast with it on the trail.

AYCE

Profile
 
 
Posted: 30 September 2007 05:00 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]  
Member
RankRankRank
Total Posts:  16
Joined  2007-07-31

I finally found my camera

Image Attachments
PICT0362 copy4.jpg
Profile
 
 
Posted: 30 September 2007 06:57 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]  
Administrator
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  432
Joined  2007-05-07

Looks great.  That unbroken momentum layer will be quite water resistant- and like you say you shouldn’t need an overbag given the dimensions you choose for the quilt.  What did you go with for foot box construction?

AYCE

Profile
 
 
Posted: 30 September 2007 07:05 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]  
Member
RankRankRank
Total Posts:  16
Joined  2007-07-31

I cut the base to 40 inches, folded it in half, and then sewed the footbox, finishing with a bar tack at the top of the seam. I guess you’d call it a “flat” footbox.

I made one other change to a standard quilt.

I put a draw string on the top, but put it about 5 inches down from the top seam, ensuring to use elastic cord for the draw string.

This 5 inch flap on the top does a really nice job of sealing the top after the Draw string gives the top a nice three dimensional shape. This fits around my shoulders better with what little air gap there would normally be getting sealed by the insulated flap. The quilt is also long enough to pull up around my head like an impromptu hood.

All in all I’m very happy with how the design turned out .... if it meets temperature tests this fall I think we’ll have a three season winner.

Profile
 
 
Posted: 14 November 2007 04:56 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]  
Member
RankRankRank
Total Posts:  16
Joined  2007-07-31

Well .... I took the quilt along on my week long section hike of the Georgia AT last week. Temps were around 30 at night with a 15 to 20 mph winds (very windy). As such, I tucked my quilt into a bivy as that much wind was making it a bit drafty.

The layered approach was great .... I had a lot of use of my micropuff pullover during the trip ... and it sure was nice to get up in the morning and not have to pull on a cold jacket .... it was still retaining the heat from the night. I would love to try a hoodie with the new insulation and momentum 90 ... but one project at a time.

The CLO formula seems like it’s dead on .... I didn’t get cold at all ... in fact, with the Bivy I wouldn’t be surprised if it would push below 20 degrees. My derived formula for a quilt was Temp rating = 60-(CLO*8.8). With the Bivy the formula should be closer to TEMP rating = 60 - (CLO * 10). A nice zipperless bag would be even better ..... hummmmm.

The Momentum fabric is comfortable, has a very nice drape, and is noiseless at night, even rubbing against the Bivy. Something that irritated me about regular nylon. It compressed down nicely too ... I left the quilt in the Bivy and just stuffed them together into the bottom of my pack. Together they only took up about 700 cubic inches (and I didn’t compress it very much).

We have a winner AYCE .... thanks again for all the help ...

Now to make a new Bivy!

Profile
 
 
Posted: 14 November 2007 05:37 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]  
Administrator
Avatar
RankRankRankRank
Total Posts:  432
Joined  2007-05-07

Good to hear Capt’n- thanks for the update.

Profile