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One layer Climashield XP 2.5 oz/sq yd 40 degrees?
Posted: 24 October 2007 01:04 AM   [ Ignore ]  
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I have read a bunch of posts and articles about many different insulations. I am still more than a little confused. It seems that loft, clo, and everything else is arguable ad infinitum, I want to make a simple quilt, and I hope for a simple answer: Can I use one layer of Climashield XP 2.5oz to achieve a 40 degree quilt? I am looking for just the quilt to provide that protection, not including any clothing I am wearing. I would use Momentum90 on the outside.

Thank you for any help,
-Rick

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Posted: 24 October 2007 10:34 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]  
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Quilts tend to suffer from air infiltration heat loss more than bags; unless you are a very warm sleeper one layer of 2.5 oz XP probably won’t be enough.

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Posted: 31 October 2007 04:26 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]  
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Thank you for your response. I am still a bit confused and torn on what insulation to use, it seems air infiltration could be addressed with a few inch skirt, but I have never made a quilt, so I obviously don’t know.

Specifically, I would like to make a quilt 78"x55” tapering down to 36” at the feet (I am 6’ and 215lb). I do sleep fairly warm and am willing to wear some clothing when the temps really drop. I hope to use Momentum ripstop for the outside and Momentum taffeta on the inside.

With these things taken into consideration which Climashield would you recommend to handle 40* comfortably and a bit less with all my clothes on? I realize this is a really specific question and am not looking for any promises of comfort, just some guidance. Any other suggestions on my plan would be welcome too.

Thanks again,
-Rick

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Posted: 31 October 2007 05:24 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 3 ]  
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Specifically, I would like to make a quilt 78"x55” tapering down to 36” at the feet (I am 6’ and 215lb). I do sleep fairly warm and am willing to wear some clothing when the temps really drop. I hope to use Momentum ripstop for the outside and Momentum taffeta on the inside.

With these things taken into consideration which Climashield would you recommend to handle 40* comfortably and a bit less with all my clothes on? I realize this is a really specific question and am not looking for any promises of comfort, just some guidance. Any other suggestions on my plan would be welcome too.

If you wanted to be minimalist, the 2.5 with your clothes in a well-sealed system with good ground insulation would probably hit the mark.  The 3.7 would be a safer bet.  5 would be sure to hit the mark. 

As much as you want a definitive answer for this question, there are too many variables at play to be able to give one.  The easiest way to know what your temp rating is for sure is to test it until it fails by pushing it past what it can handle while keeping something warm in reserve to fall back on when it does.  I do this with a thermometer with a ‘low temp’ record so I know what the low was on a night where I get cold.  If this is something that you would feel comfortable doing, and weight is of paramount concern, try the 2.5.  If you only want to make one of these things, go with something heavier.  The 5 would bump up your weight by 7-8 oz, the 3.7 by 3 to 4.

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Posted: 06 November 2007 02:03 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 4 ]  
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Along those lines, what is the formula that is used to convert X in CLO x oz/yd^2 = X into approximate degrees? I want to use Climashield.

I’m trying to make a quilt that is rated to about 10 degrees F. I need to be able to use to about 20 degrees F. Thanks for the info.

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Posted: 06 November 2007 03:07 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 5 ]  
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In a well sealed bag with good ground insulation

clo 2 @ 40 deg
clo 4 @ 20 deg
clo 6 @ 0 deg

There are a lot of variables in play that can have a big impact on that chart: use it without blinders.

Quilts have trouble below freezing.  Make sure you design in a good way to seal it up.

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Posted: 07 November 2007 12:08 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 6 ]  
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The folks at jacksRbetter have an idea for attacking the air infiltration issue.  I haven’t tried anything like that but they’ve been at it long enough that there must be some field reports out there somewhere.

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Posted: 09 November 2007 03:06 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 7 ]  
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<<< edit >>>

Sorry - I should read through all the previous posts before I ask my question.  I think it’s already been answered elsewhere.

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Posted: 20 November 2007 03:57 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 8 ]  
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I just wanted to report back. I am wrapping up my quilt using momentum and a single layer of Climashield Combat. The night before last I went in my backyard, it was 38* and I just had on shorts and a t-shirt. it was fine. The quilt weighs just over 18oz.

Thank you for all the help,
-Rick

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Posted: 20 November 2007 06:39 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 9 ]  
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Great to hear rsperko.  Enjoy your time on the trail with it!

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Posted: 20 November 2007 06:53 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 10 ]  
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Rick,

Just a quick question to help me interpret your results.  You slept comfortably overnight with a low temp of 38*F or you spent some non-sleeping time comfortably under the quilt at 38*F?  (metabolism tends to be slower when sleeping)

Ain’t it great to replace a sleeping bag with a quilt weighing less than a bottle of soda?

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Posted: 20 November 2007 07:32 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 11 ]  
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I just laid under it for a while, not real world testing. But if I can be comfortable laying still for a while in boxers and tshirt, I think fully dressed I should be able to make it to 40*. I still need to sew up the bottom and close off the footbox. I will try some real sleep testing after that. I am still impressed.

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Posted: 21 November 2007 01:45 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 12 ]  
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Jim Colten - 20 November 2007 06:53 PM

Rick,

Just a quick question to help me interpret your results.  You slept comfortably overnight with a low temp of 38*F or you spent some non-sleeping time comfortably under the quilt at 38*F?  (metabolism tends to be slower when sleeping)

Ain’t it great to replace a sleeping bag with a quilt weighing less than a bottle of soda?

Isn’t it!

And the newer insulations take up so much less space than the previous insulations for the same temp rating.

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Posted: 21 November 2007 05:16 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 13 ]  
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And the newer insulations take up so much less space than the previous insulations for the same temp rating

I don’t know how Climashield compares but I was very impressed by the compressibility of Thru-Hiker’s prequilted PrimaLoft One even compared to PrimaLoft Sport.

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Posted: 23 November 2007 12:48 AM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 14 ]  
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for me, in a Bivy, I’ve found AYCE’s clo to Temp values are pretty accurate for my quilt.

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Posted: 06 April 2008 10:18 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 15 ]  
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So we are on the other side of winter, back to the 40* mark. Slept in the quilt all night last night. It was quite warm for me with the single layer combat. I could easily take this to mid 30s with clothing.

Thanks again,
-Rick

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