Primaloft Sport or Climashield XP in a quilt?
Posted: 24 November 2007 12:45 AM   [ Ignore ]  
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Hello,
Me again.
I’ve finally come up with a quilt design I want to use but would like to figure out one last problem before I pull the trigger
Should I use 3oz PL Sport or 2.5oz Climashield XP?
Whichever one I use, I’ll have an additional layer of prequilted 1.8oz Primaloft One in the torso area.
The dimensions of the quilt are approximately 6’ long by 56” wide tapering to 38”

The deciding factors, I think, will be
-stuffed size- My current sleeping bag takes up about 240cubic inches (4liters) in my pack (I use a Sea to Summit size XS stuffsack).  Do you think a quilt made in the dimensions above, using 2.5oz XP (and a 30” long section of 1.8oz PL1 over the torso) would fit into a similar sized stuffsack as my current bag?
-warmth- the total clo of the 2.5oz XP is a little lower than the 3oz Primaloft Sport, but the PL will require quilting to secure sections as large as 24"x24” (right?), so will all the zero-loft areas in the hypothetical PL Sport bag make it less warm or as warm as the XP bag? -Also, keep in mind that I’ll have that second layer of prequilted PL1 to possibly layer with the zero-loft areas in the layers by stacking them offset over each other…
-longevity?- I’m not looking for something to last as long as a down quilt, but how does Primaloft Sport compare to Climashield XP in terms of loft retention, and which one is more susceptible to loss of loft by moderate (not heavy) compression?

thanks for the replies

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Posted: 24 November 2007 12:27 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 1 ]  
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Continuous filament insulations like XP are a better choice for large panel items like quilts while apparel works better for apparel.  You can use PL sport for a quilt but you’ll have to jump through a lot of hoops to get it stabilized correctly. I don’t think primaloft is a practical choice for a quilt (with the exception of the prequilted momentum-pl1).

PL will compress smaller.  It sounds like pack real estate is high enough on your priority list that you’re willing to consider PL for your project despite the PITA factor.

Be warned that standard prequilted 1.8 oz PL1 comes with two layers of scrim which adds @.4oz/sq yd per layer. 
Consider the prequilted 6 oz momentum-PL1-scim or 3 oz momentum-PL1-scrim-momentum instead of the pl sport. PL1 stuff has the smallest packed volume.  It also has the least loft per unit weight as compared to PL sport, XP, or Combat, so folks who equate an inch of loft between different insulations will not like PL1. 
The prequilted momentum choices would either be more insulation than you’re thinking (the 6 oz) or make it impossible to include your extra body layer (the 3 oz).

Climashield’s long term durability is unknown as it has only been on the market for a short time.  To date signs are positive that longevity is improved as compared to earlier iterations of continuous filament insulatons, esp delta.

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Posted: 24 November 2007 04:16 PM   [ Ignore ]   [ # 2 ]  
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I was thinking about your split insulation type (climashield continuous filament & primaloft short staple) which is something that doesn’t get discussed much.

There’s a description of an interesting spin on this use in a Wiggy patent.  IIRC he first quilted a small basis weight of short staple insulation to the shell and liner and then floated a layer of continuous filament insulation between the two to get the clo value he was shooting for. 
The short staple fibers intertwining with the continuous filament insulation was intended to stabilize it.  Clever idea. 

You can look up the details for this with a patent search.

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